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THE TICHBORNE CLAIMANT Poster Broadsheet
Name: THE TICHBORNE CLAIMANT Poster Broadsheet
Price:
GBP75.00
Stock Status: In Stock

  THE TICHBORNE CLAIMANT Poster Broadsheet
click to see larger image
  THE TICHBORNE CLAIMANT Poster Broadsheet
click to see larger image
  THE TICHBORNE CLAIMANT Poster Broadsheet
click to see larger image
 

Description

THE Tichborne claimant Poster Broadsheet.

Issued by the "Police News" in 1874, priced at one penny.  This large folded sheet is on news print paper and shows portraits of the main protagonists in the trial, locations and court scenes.  It was probably very widely circulated at the time of this celebrated trial but is now a very scarce piece of ephemera.

The sheet measures approx 24 x 18 inches (folded) and 36 x 24 inches (unfolded).  Torn at corner with paper loss and with some edge tears and creasing, but in very nice condition comensurate with its fragility and age.

 The case of the Tichborne Claimant was one of the most celebrated and reported civil cases of the 19th century.  The heir to the Tichborne baronetcy, Roger Tichborne, was presumed to have drowned in a shipwreck off Brazil in 1854. His grieving mother, believing him to be still alive, advertised widely enquiring after his whereabouts and in 1866 a butcher from Wagga Wagga, Australia, came forward claiming to be the lost heir. Lady Tichborne brought him to England and, although he appeared unrefined and ill-educated, she instantly accepted him as her lost son, although the majority of the family refused to do so.  When she died in March 1868 there began a long legal battle in which the identity of Roger Tichborne was disputed and his right to inherit the title and estates was hotly contested. The court eventually held that the claimant was, in fact, Arthur Orton, the son of a butcher from Wapping who, whilst in Australia had also gone under the name of Thomas Castro.  Following his loss of the protracted civil case he was prosecuted for perjury in what was one of the longest trials in the history of the English criminal law and was subsequently sentenced to 14 years imprisonment. Following his release on licence in 1884 Orton continued to pursue his claim but, by then, the public had lost their appetite for the affair and he died destitute on 1st April 1898. Although he is known as one of the great fraudsters and imposters of history, there is some evidence to suggest that he may indeed have been the real Roger Tichborne. When he died, it is reported that 5,000 people attended his funeral and the family allowed the coffin to bear the inscription "Sir Roger Charles Doughty Tichborne" and the burial was so recorded in the Paddington cemetery records.

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